A Granddaughter’s Dream Comes True

- by Vonna Harper

I can hardly believe it’s finally happening but starting today, my grandfather’s creativity is leaving the boxes in my office and entering the electronic age. Instead of blithering through an explanation, I’m letting the following press release from Musa Publishing www.MusaPublishing.com tell the tale.

Vella Munn aka Vonna Harper

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 The Mystery Of Homer Eon Flint’s Death Still Relevant After Nine Decades

 In 1924, a young writer with a growing career, Homer Eon Flint, was found dead, at the bottom of a canyon, pinned beneath an allegedly stolen taxi with a gun beside him.  His death was sensationalized by the media.  Some sources averred that he’d participated in a bank robbery. Others that he committed suicide because of his interest in the occult. A convicted gangster who died in prison a few years later testified that Flint had hijacked his car at gunpoint and driven away, presumably to die in an accident later.  And, finally, there’s been a growing opinion over the past nine decades that Homer Eon Flint was a victim—in the wrong place at the wrong time and killed as a result—and that opinion has created an aura of mystery around his name.

Homer Eon Flint is commonly considered one of the early twentieth century American pioneers in science fiction.  His popular science fiction books (like The Devolutionist or The Emancipatrix) have remained as pillars of the speculative fiction genre throughout the ninety plus years since their release.  The Blind Spot, co-written with fellow pioneer Austin Hall, has been reprinted seven times.  Aside from those successes, Flint was a well-known writer of pulp fiction—some of his stories garnering payments of hundreds of dollars in the booming post World War I economy.

But no matter how you approach Homer Eon Flint, somehow you always end up back with his death.

Fellow writer Ralph Parker Anderson, when asked if Flint had died a criminal as alleged, replied, “I do not accept the common view that he was a robber. If he had committed a crime, it would have been a superbly clever one, not the ordinary thievery.”

Modern writers and scholars tend to agree. This writer who envisaged space travel and genetic testing back when the automobile and movies were still fairly new, would most certainly not have committed a carjacking. So there’s always the feeling that there’s more to the story—and a part of the story that the protagonist did not live to tell.

On January 15, 2012, Musa Publishing, an independent press, will begin to release the entire collection of Homer Eon Flint’s work—including his previously unpublished and lost manuscripts, a biography written by his granddaughter, author Vella Munn, and the incredible science fiction stories he’s best known for.  Each release will include introductory and archival material, and further materials will be available for download on the new Homer Eon Flint website. (www.homereonflint.com)

“We believe that Homer Eon Flint would embrace digital literature,” editorial

10 comments

  1. How satisfying to see your grandfather’s work released to find readers again. Who knows if your biography and renewed interest in his writing, his life, and his death, may not bring some answers, even after 90 years.

    Congratulations!

  2. What an amazing story!

  3. Vella: I’m so happy that your grandfather’s work is alive in the world again! And it’s all due to your dedication and determination! Congratulations, my friend!

    Lynda

  4. What a great project — this is fascinating.

    Congratulations!

  5. Vella, congratulations on the new release of your grandfather’s fiction! Absolutely fascinating story.
    Mary

  6. A fascinating story! Wow. Congrats on getting it told and having his work see the light of day again.

  7. Vella – your tenacity paid off. What satisfaction you must feel bringing your grandfather’s fiction to the attention of today’s readers. Congratulations.

  8. Congratulations, Vella. This must feel so very satisfying. I’m sure your grandfather would have been very proud of you. Well done!

  9. How wonderful that you’ve been able to bring your grandfather’s work back after so many years to a new group of readers!

  10. Congrats! Absolutely fascinating. I’m going to definitely check out his work. Talk about a mystery wrapped in an enigma!